Market Recap 2

Spring Market was a busy one indeed! I was thrilled to be able to work with the esteemed Amy Butler her new collection for FreeSpirit Fabrics. Each quilt is available as a free pattern, found HERE.

I ADORE both collections and had so many ideas for each. It was so hard to narrow it down to just a few. I am so happy with how the designs turned out.

 

True Love – featuring Soul Mate by Amy Butler.

True Love came from an image in my head of little cartoon hearts floating above the heads of a couple newly in love. That love is fresh, vibrant, and feels like a dream. There is potential in that love, for something deeper and true, but only time will tell.

Cross My Heart – featuring Soul Mate by Amy Butler

Cross My Heart was the first design out of my brain. I new immediately I wanted to do a cross stitch heart when I heard the collection name. even before I saw the prints. As I colored in each stitch, I imagined a couple who have weathered the test of time. Each stitch is a memory, a milestone, that over time has woven two lives together in a tapestry of love.

You Complete Me – featuring Soul Mate by Amy Butler

Finally, You Complete Me. this is my favorite of the three quilts. Is the feeling when you find each other and realise you fit together perfectly. You are two halfs of the same whole, Soul Mates.

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Two of the quilts, Cross My Heart and You Complete Me, were adapted for Amy’s Spice Market Tote. They are addenums to the original pattern.

I hope you enjoy Soul Mates. I loved sewing with it. The feel of the poplin is featherlight and soft, and I could just wrap myself in it all day.

Happy Stitching,

Quilt Market Flashback

This past Quilt Market in St. Louis looked like a fun one. I wasn’t able to attend in person but I did have a plethora of quiltings hanging throughout.
Today I want to show you my latest for Timeless Treasures and Dear Stella. Each quilt has a free pattern attached to it.

First up, and probably my favorite, is the Space Station Quilt for Supernova by Rae Ritchie. I love Rae’s design style and it is always a pleasure to work with her prints.

My older son helped me pick the fabric placement for this one. He loves space and one days he wants to be an astronaut/karate kid/hockey player. This quilt gets to live at home with us. HE was absolutely thrilled when “his” design was picked for the collection, and doubly so when he saw the finished quilt. The pattern is available HERE from Dear Stella.

Next is the pattern CHOMP! for the Dark and Stormy Collection I just LOVED the sea theme and immediately thought of sharks popping out of the water. During the process I am pretty sure my family managed to come up with more than a dozen unique shark puns as name suggestions for the pattern.

The shark teeth can be made 3D or pieced. I thought it was clever to use the pirate head print for the teeth. Tee hee! You can find the pattern HERE.

For Timeless Treasures I got to play with a more traditional collection, Zephyr by Alice Kennedy. There are 22 neutral and greyscale hues in 15 unique prints. I loved how they all played together, and the varying levels of contrast meant I could create a lot of depth and texture without adding color.

The first quilt, Halo, is my favorite. I grew up in northern Alberta and at night, with the moon shining brightly, you could often see (what we called) “moon dogs” haloing the moon. The shimmering ice crystals were my inspiration for this quilt. You can find the pattern HERE.

 

I probably overquilted it, but I don’t care! The black spaces were calling to me. I used a deep navy thread for a subtle glow against the black fabric, and to prevent eye strain while I was quilting. I quilted a series of loops, swirls, straight lines, and circles. This quilt gets to live at Timeless headquarters in New York. (Does that mean I get to say I have art hanging in New York? I’m going to say YES!)

The second quilt, Marbled, I wanted to play with simple shapes that make a complex texture. I wanted a tile wall-inspired flow and form to the quilt. Pretty sure I succeeded with that. You can find the pattern HERE.

Next week I will showcase more Market pieces.

Until next time,

Happy Stitching!

Sample Sale

The time has come for me to face the music. I have too many quilts, and not nearly enough space. So I think a sample sale is in order! If I am going to continue creating new things, I need to have room to keep them.

This has been a very hard decision, months in the making. I put a lot of myself into my quilts. They are intricately woven into the tapestry of my life. Small memories that become tied into the creative process return every time I pull them out. I will be sad to see them go, but I can be happy knowing they are going to be loved and appreciated and used like quilts should be.

The gallery below has the available quilts. To claim a quilt, leave a comment on this post with your email and the quilt you would like. The comments are private so no one will see the information but myself.

Thank you for all your readership and support over the last 4 years. Being able to share quilting with the world is one of the best parts of my life. I look forward to many more years of creating.

Happy Stitching,

Stacey

xoxo

What Shade Are You? Winner Announced!

Today is my turn for the RJR What Shade Are You blog hop! I love participating in blogs hops, it gives me a chance to create something just for me, and have a little fun with all of my wonderful followers (Hint: FABRIC!) This is my second appearance in the blog hop. My first was back in 2015 with my Lanterns quilt Tutorial. It felt like only yesterday, and the ways my life has changed in such a short time, from there to here, is truly amazing. From a new house, to a new baby, to new opportunities within the quilting world, the last 2 years have been busy and scary and WONDERFUL.

RJR makes Cotton Supreme Solids. They are a dream to sew with. The fabric is the perfect weight to mix with anything, and you have 197 rich, delicious hues to choose from.

Now let me introduce my newest creation, Heat Wave!

I LOVE everything about this quilt. The colors, the layout, the quilting, everything. I’m sure somewhere there is a grouchy quilt police officer wagging a finger and chanting “Stacey, you are being prideful. You can’t just TELL PEOPLE you LOVE your own work.” But you know what? The hashtag for RJR is #quiltwithlove . So I just threw this quilt over their head, because I LOVE IT! I want to shout that love from the rooftops!

I picked an analogous gradient of my favorite warm colors and went to town. Each color is a color I love individually, and together they make a perfect sunset inspired palette.

Heat Wave is the perfect example of how a small change can make a huge difference. I had mocked up a different layout for these blocks, something eclectic and busy and kinda neat, but in my near-coma-like sleep deprived state I sewed half the blocks as a mirror image of the first. And I didn’t notice until I started laying the blocks out. After a little head scratching (because I STILL hadn’t noticed what I’d done) I turned the blocks around and VOILA!  Heat Wave was born! I still had to take a picture so I could purposefully do what I just did accidentally (and then FINALLY realized what had happened), but the top came together quickly after that and it couldn’t have turned out better.

The next step was quilting, and I had Heat Wave hanging over the bars of Penny(my Tin Lizzie Apprentice) for almost a week while I pondered. Then I realized it was Wednesday (again, I blame the sleep deprivation). Now I know some blogs are really good at showcasing just a top. Me, not so much. So she needed to be quilted, and quilted now. The funny thing is once I had her loaded on the frame, the quilting just fell into place. I recently returned from a family vacation, where I was able to meet up with a quilting friend. She once told me an anecdote from a famous longarm quilter (don’t ask who, I really can’t remember) and it always stuck with me. The moral of the story is when it comes to thread choice, always take the risk. So I did. I matched the yellow and violet fabrics in my quilt, and then used each color exclusively with the motif. Violet with the straight lines and yellow with the curled meander. The contrasting thread and patterns really worked well to highlight the secondary patterns in the quilt, and reigned in the pre-quilted color chaos.

To top off the perfection of this quilt, I chose to face it instead of binding to keep the colors flowing. Paired with the first really nice sunny day we’ve had in weeks, it felt like magic taking her outside to photograph. Even H wanted his turn with the camera! (We now have a lovely montage of grass growing.)

Now for the fun part (and the reward for reading to the end)! One lucky follower gets to win a bundle of the gorgeous Sunset Palette I curated for my quilt.

To enter, follow me here or on Instagram @staceyinstitches, and leave a single comment telling me 2 things: Where you follow me, and what your favorite color is! Easy peasy! I will draw a winner at 4pm PST Tuesday.

 

Congratulations to number 82, Deborah! I will be in touch soon!

There is also a second giveaway on the RJR Instagram Account. Log on and follow RJR Fabrics instructions to enter.

Happy Stitching!

The Frog Pile Quilt- A Derivative Work

 

Circa 2003, one of my first quilts.

Circa 2003, one of my first quilts.

 

Frog Pile was a super simple raw edge fusible applique project back in 2003 (13 years ago, SAY WHAT?!) At the time I was playing with images I found on the internet, enlarging them in Microsoft Paint and then using MS Paint to erase the individual pixels of color until I had an outline only image (see how high tech I was, haha!) and printing them off for raw edge applique. It was my first baby steps into designing my own stuff, and as a way to experiment with fabric, form, and techniques. I saw this super cute Frog Pile picture, and being a total newbie to the world of art and copyright (read: had no clue about it at all) I went ahead and made this little quilt. It measures 8″ x 11″ and currently hangs in a frame in the home of a good friend. I always wanted to make another, and receive requests for the pattern all the time, but time being what it is, and not being a super organized teenager, I lost both the original image file and the templates I created from it.

From time to time I would search for “Frog Pile” on the internet, scouring through pages of images, but never coming up with the correct image.

Flash forward to 2016. I know much, MUCH more about the art world, copyright, and I fully believe in and do credit my sources and inspirations. I also know a lot more about derivative works. And I get a lot of comments on my Frog Pile quilt, and requests for a pattern.

A derivative work is a work based on or derived from one or more already exist- ingworks. Common derivative works include translations, musical arrange- ments, motion picture versions of literary material or plays, art reproductions, abridgments, and condensations of preexisting works. – www.copyright.gov  This website has a very informative PDF, clicking the link will take you straight to it.

So how does this apply to Frog pile? Well, I received another pattern request this last week, and I tried an internet search again. AND I FOUND IT! On a number of resources. The first is a counted cross stitch pattern released from Design Works. The second is a digital image uploaded to Photobucket by a user simblesimble. Neither has a date of production on it, but the cross stitch artist, Royce B. McClure, does have a copyright on the design. I went ahead and purchased the kit, because I love it so much. 

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Now, for reference, I once created a dragon quilt based on a Teresa Wentzler cross stitch pattern and entered it in a local quilt show (2004). I emailed her, and she said that the quilt was a derivative work, so as long as I credited the original, then it was okay. The reason it is derivative is because the design medium is different from the original work. If I had gone ahead and made a cross stitch of the same work, especially without crediting the original artist, then would be a copyright violation.

This is all very general, as the world of copyright in art and design has some very concrete and some very obtuse legalese that makes the whole thing seem like a big ol’ grey area. I have even attended lectures from a lawyer about copyright who said that even the information presented was not 100% concrete. It makes things messy in the art world, and is a huge topic of debate and misinformation in the quilting world. I certainly do not know enough about it to ever be quoted as a source, and this is not intended as legal advise. Please make sure you do your own research and ALWAYS give credit, and respect individual artists works. 

So, that all being said, Frog Pile is considered a derivative work. I cannot, and will not, create a marketable a pattern from it, not even to give away, because I strongly believe that would fall under a copyright violation and I don’t want to take any chances.  I can, however, provide you with a source to purchase your own Frog Pile kit if you ever wanted to make your own derivative quilt from it, and encourage you to do so.

In Canada – Amazon.ca

In the US – Joanne.com

And of course you can always Google search your own sources.

If you like to cross stitch, I also recommend visiting Teresa Wentzlers site and having a look at the gorgeous art and patterns she has available. I am lucky enough to own her book and a pair of her patterns.

Happy Stitching!

StaceyDay_Logo

 

 

Will You Be You?

I am so excited about this quilt! This is a QDAD to reality quilt from the summer. I love it for a number of reasons.

  1. I made it at my Grandma’s house, so it will always bring back good memories of sewing with her
  2. STARS! WOO!
  3. I was able to use batiks in a modern way, and I LOVE batiks!
  4. It is just so colorful and fun, that it can be enjoyed even without the social commentary
  5. It’s been published in Modern Quilts Unlimited, along with a pattern from my good friend Amy Garro of 13 Spools, who just happens to be that issues covergirl
Will You Be You

Will You Be You

What’s that? Social Commentary you say? What could that possibly be?

Well, in QDAD we often have themed design weeks. Kim Andersson of I Adore Pattern was in charge for this theme: Song Lyrics! It was a ton of fun, and an interesting challenge. on May 27th, Kim posted this beauty of a lyric and palette:

10468086_10153322219697673_4149422899423549670_nWe have all heard the song, and know it’s about a breakup. But when you take just those first five lines of the song out of context, it dramatically changes. If you had never heard the song before, you might think this was a song about being discovered, but at the same time having everything about you changed to fit the ideal of someone else without much control. Which really struck me. How often to people change themselves, or have themselves changed, in order to fit in? To make others happy? To become something or someone else entirely in order to please someone else? And when you change everything about yourself, what do you lose in the process? How much of the real you is left?

The design started off a whole conversation that was a lot of fun, and people had such a positive response to it that I decided to submit it to MQU. Happily they accepted it, and I changed a couple of colors to work with what I had in my stash (that light lavender is gorgeous but so hard to find in a batik). The color change did lighten the mood of the quilt, but the message remained the same.

The original QDAD design

The original QDAD design

Recolored

Recolored

It was a lot of fun, and a challenge to put together in a cohesive manner. Eventually I realized that one star at a time was the way to go, and used a combination of quarter and half square triangles to keep things interesting (also less seams). I quilted it using a pantograph, mostly because of time constraints, but there is a TON of potential there for custom quilting. I think some radiating straight lines from the yellow star out to the far borders would be an appropriate subcontext to the quilt. In yellow thread, it would read as the superstar overshadowing the original pieces. Also, it would look really really pretty!

I have been trying to use colored or contrasting threads for my quilting lately. I get to hang out with some awesome quilters and longarmers, and one thing that has stayed with me since my last conversation with Miriam, who owns Whispering Pines and is an incredible longarm quilter, is that it’s hard to go wrong with a bold thread choice. Yes, it’s a risk, but it tends to pay off. For example, I have a black and white quilt that I quilted with navy (almost purple, but it was more plum than violet and wasn’t quite as effective)

 

WYBY2

I hope you all pick up the Winter 2016 issue of Modern Quilts Unlimited. The issue has a great assortments of quilts and projects, and most of them are pretty spectacular (especially mine and Amy’s, wink wink!)

If you do make your own version, I would love to see it! I love to see what people make from my patterns! Tag me on instagram @staceyinstitches or email me a picture so I can ooh and aah over it and post it here!

Also, a huge special thank you to my neighbor Debbie and my friend Anne! Today was the first sunny afternoon in ages, so I had to try and take pictures like NOW. My little H (who isn’t so little anymore) tried his best to hold up the quilt but it was just a little too long and heavy for him, but Deb pulled up just in time and totally volunteered a hand to hold. Then Anne took my twilight photos and made them colorful again! Thanks both of you! ❤

Stay tuned for my stop on the Dryad Blog Hop next week, and, as always,

Happy Stitching!

StaceyDay_Logo

Letters from Quiltcon

Yesterday emails were sent, read, and either celebrated or commiserated over.

The wait is over, and Quiltcon has its show quilts. Regrettably, none of my quilts will be hanging in Austin this February. Nor am I the only one without an entry, many of my amazing, talented quilting friends did not get in. Instagram has a new hashtag: #quiltconreject

Here is where I have a problem: the word reject.

Reject can be a verb or a noun. As a verb, reject means “dismiss as inadequate, inappropriate, or not to one’s taste” As a noun, reject means “a person or thing dismissed as failing to meet standards or satisfy tastes”. Reject has the undertones of failure, inadequacy, of not being good enough. Its not a very happy word, and using it to describe ourselves and out work is detrimental and frankly insulting.

People, WE ARE NOT REJECTS.

We were not rejected, we were regretfully passed up. Not because our quilts weren’t good enough, but because they just didn’t fit with the vision the curators had for the show.

It is hard to get a letter saying that your work is not chosen. I understand all too well. But that does not mean you aren’t good enough.

Jess over at Quilty Habit spelled it out perfectly in her blog post Positive thoughts on Quiltcon Rejection. She gets to the heart of the matter in a great way. there were over 1300 entries to Quiltcon. The show coordinators have a vision of how they want Modern Quilting to be represented to the public, and the quilts they chose reflect that vision. There are so many interpretations of Modern Quilting, so many aesthetics and techniques and visions, that to narrow it down to one must have been agonizing. But they did, and then they had to flip through the thousand plus entries to find the quilts that reflect the chosen aesthetic. It is the same selection process used in museums and art galleries. You could submit a masterful landscape painting that accurately reflects the people, time, and techniques of the style, but if they want flowers in vases, the landscape isn’t going to make it, no matter how talented and perfect the landscape is.

From what I have seen from the quilts that did get in, this year Modern Quilting will be represented by bright, bold colors, simple quilting, color blocking, and graphic designs.

So lets change the hashtag. Lets rejoice in our shared love of quilting! Lets cheer for our friends in the show! Lets ooh and aah over the quilts that will be displayed, and see the show for what it is : a curated selection of quilts, selected from a pool of the best modern quilts in the world-our quilts!

#notaquiltconreject

*UPDATE* Latifah Saafir at The Quilt Engineer has an amazing, insightful post about the jury process. Go check it out, it helps to put things in perspective!

Happy Goes Mini

Happy Goes Mini